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Medlock Soul Revival: Installation

Exhibition piece in Link Gallery, Manchester Metropolitan University. 27th Feb – 7th March 2013.

Conclusion of 6 week psychogeography project exploring the River Medlock. The installation includes sand and water from the Medlock; a video projection of the section of the river I was exploring; a hi-vis jacket with embroidered and screen printed logo ‘Medlock Soul Revival’; and two showcases of research material including objects from the river bank, books and photographs.

The installation attracted a lot of comment and interest.

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After taking it down I returned the sand to the banks of the river Medlock.

The showcases with research material are staying on display for a bit longer.

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Medlock Soul Revival (Ancoats Beach – Interventions, Observations)

Engaging with the beach, collecting objects from the sand, raking the beach…

 

Some clips of the river at the beach….

 

Hi-vis jacket – ordered online. Embroidered logo on front, print on back….

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Roundhouse (Field Trip: Litter Shrine)

Christ Church, the original building that became the Roundhouse, closed in 1880.

Manchester Settlement: a registered charity founded in 1895 by the University of Manchester.

The original home was the Roundhouse in Ancoats, Manchester. It provided a large recreation room for plays and dances.

In 1963 the Settlement moved out of its other building at Ancoats Hall.

The Roundhouse was demolished in 1986.

In May 2009 the charity moved into a new £2.2m centre in Openshaw.

Today: January 31st 2013, the brick circle contains silver birches, wild brambles and much litter.

An unusual amount of discarded footwear.

Intervention: ‘Litter Shrine‘.

 

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Ancoats Beach (Field Trip 3)

Buying a rake.

But arriving at the site and seeing there were three Environment Agency Vehicles there.

An animal hole.

The snow has melted.

Patterns in the sand.

Starting at the gated land that was once the Ancoats Nursery School…..

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And as Ancoats Nursery School was, on Palmerston Street, 1965.

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Ancoats Nursery School on Palmerston Street, 1965. Courtesy J. Shaw

Due to the snowmelt the river Medlock is high today….

IMG_2944 IMG_2946The Environment Agency arrived to clear some of the rubbish….one of the men said that they would clear the sand away at some point. The barriers are to prevent trees and large rubbish entering the culverts in Manchester city centre. Once larger objects enter the culverts it is hard to remove them, and they can cause flooding.

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Ancoats Beach (Field Trip 2)

Circling the Beach looking for concentric clues.

Melancholic trash.

Limekiln remains. Bricks.

Beswick poverty, poor store protected by monumental stones.

The invisible Ancoats Art Museum.

Manchester University Settlement and the Roundhouse.

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loneliness / solitude

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the suchness of everyday objects / the uniqueness of a thing in and of itself

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a feeling of nostalgia

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mystery / hidden, ineffible dimension of reality

IMG_2845 IMG_2848Footpath up Lime Bank….

IMG_2850The birthday balloon has moved from the fence by the river and up the track…

IMG_2851 IMG_2852 IMG_2853Lime Bank, off Ashton Old Road….

IMG_2854‘Dark Island’ – all the way from the Orkney Brewery…

IMG_2855 IMG_2856I thought this mini-mart was probably closed down. But it is an ongoing open business. The council put the stone blocks around it after several car ram-raids on the shop….

IMG_2857 IMG_2858 IMG_2859I asked one of the guys in the shop if they knew where this stone came from, but they didn’t know. I was hoping it might have come from Ancoats Hall / Art Museum. Would love to find out.

IMG_2863Ardwick Youth Club demolition is progressing….

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IMG_2868This uprooted tree must have seeded  on top of a demolished building site – many bricks in the roots…

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IMG_2885The site of Ancoats Hall and Ancoats Art Museum.

The Art Museum Committee was formed in December 1877, with the support and involvement of the Manchester Literary Club, the Manchester and Salford Sanitary Association, of which Thomas Horsfall had long been a member, the Manchester Statistical Society, local branches of the Sunday Society, the Ancoats Recreation Committee, and, from 1879, the Ruskin Society. Owens College and the Manchester Academy of Fine Arts were also involved, and support came from the Manchester Guardian in the shape of journalists W. T. Arnold and C. P. Scott. Despite a general air of moral support, the local and national depression was partly responsible for a lack of funding for Horsfall’s Art Museum project, and the delays this caused were compounded by difficult negotiations with Manchester Corporation. Although rooms were initially taken for the Art Museum at a new gallery in Queen’s Park, in north Manchester, relations between the Art Museum Committee and the Parks Committee broke down, and the former seat of the Mosley family at Ancoats Hall on the western bank of the River Medlock was not eventually secured until 1886, when it became the Museum’s home.

It eventually closed in 1953 when most of the collection was transferred to the Manchester Art Gallery (formerly the Royal Manchester Institution).

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ancoats_hall_chethams_library© Chetham’s Library, Manchester

(Note Bonnie Prince Charlie stayed at Ancoats Hall in 1745 – entertained by Oswald Mosley in the house which was then a Tudor design.)

In 1800 Mosely sold the Hall the local mill owner George murray, who demolished the hall and built a smaller Gothic structure in its place. That Hall was the one bought by T.C. Horsfall in 1876.

When the Hall became the Art Museum, William Morris helped Horsfall with wallpapers and textiles, which went up alongside engravings of Pre-Raphaelite works, and paintings by G.F.Watts and Turner.

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Ancoats Hall, 20 Every Street,  1964 © Manchester Libraries

See blog on Thomas Horsfell and Manchester Art Museum

A lime kiln lane 1884Lime Kiln Lane, detail from 1880 OS for South Lancashire, courtsey of Digital Archives, http://www.digitalarchives.co.uk/

The events being the Man City matches mainly…..

IMG_2891This circular brick wall marks the spot of Christ Church, otherwise known as ‘The Round House’, opened in 1824. This was a chapel for the Bible Christian Movement. Members of the church were vegetarian and also political radicals. The first members BCM followed the lead of charismatic preacher William Cowherd who preached the revolutionary politics of Thomas Paine. Cowherd died before the chapel was established and his successor was Joseph Brotherton, who later became Salford’s first MP. Note that Brotherton’s wife, Martha, wrote the first vegetarian cookbook in 1812. The Church closed in 1880, moved into the hands of the Salvation Army and then to the Manchester University Settlement (which was also based at the nearby Ancoats Hall). In 1963 the Settlement moved out of Ancoats Hall and the building was subsequently demolished.

The chapel was sited on a burial ground, the gravestones of which are visible and arranged around the circle.

Through the silver birches can be seen the towers of All Soul’s Church further down Every Street.

IMG_2894The circle is sadly neglected and has become a tip for rubbish…..

IMG_2898 IMG_2903 IMG_2904 IMG_2906 IMG_2909 IMG_2913All Soul’s Church on Every Street. Pevsner describes it as “idiosyncratic Romanesque” in style. It closed in 1981.

‘Every’ comes from Yvery after Baron Yvery, whose daughter married into the landowning Mosley family.

IMG_2914 IMG_2917 IMG_2919 IMG_2923 IMG_2925 IMG_2926 IMG_2932The other side of Ardwick Youth Club demolition…

IMG_2938There was a school here on Palmerston Street – now demolished….

IMG_2939A brief return to the Round House site. “Dee Dee” (dog?) and glass table tops…

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